Services

What is an Individualized Evaluation?

In an individualized evaluation, concerns regarding a client’s functioning are evaluated through the methodical collection, scoring, and interpretation of data. The process begins with specific concerns or questions about the client’s thoughts, feelings, behaviors, and/or functioning (e.g. academic, social). Dr. Martin then uses a selection of tests, rating scales, and interviews to gather information about the client’s functioning in the areas of concern. This helps generate a fuller understanding about their unique pattern of strengths and weaknesses. Dr. Martin can then offer diagnoses and share detailed recommendations about how to address difficulties and maximize strengths.

Specific Learning Disorder Evaluation

A specific learning disorder or learning disability is a developmental disorder where a child demonstrates significant difficulty in learning to read, write, or perform math problems. The most common type of learning disability is dyslexia, which is a neurobiological disorder characterized by difficulties with word recognition, decoding words, reading fluently, and spelling. Dysgraphia is a term used to describe difficulties with writing, spelling, grammar, and/or poor or illegible handwriting. Dyscalculia is a term used to describe difficulties with math facts and math calculation.
A specific learning disorder evaluation may include the following components:
• A diagnostic interview with the parent or caregiver that includes developmental history and current concerns

• Cognitive assessment

• Academic assessment in all areas of reading, written expression, and mathematics

• Phonological processing

• Orthographic processing

• Learning and Memory

• Social, emotional, and behavioral questionnaires and rating scales completed by parents, teachers, and older children/adolescents

• Review of school records, curriculum-based measures, grades, and work samples

• A comprehensive, integrated written report with results, DSM-V diagnoses, recommendations for eligibility for school services (special education or 504 eligibility), recommendations and resources for parents/teachers, and recommendations for services in the community.

• A feedback meeting with parents to review the results of the evaluation, recommendations, and develop a plan for treatment and prioritizing services

Psychological Evaluation

A psychological evaluation examines an individual’s emotional and behavioral functioning in areas such as anxiety, depression, emotional dysregulation, and aggression.

Most children will experience normal fears or worries throughout childhood. Children and adolescents with anxiety disorders have significant fears or worries that have a negative impact on their daily functioning. You may become concerned when your child’s worries control your family’s behaviors or activities. You might be concerned because your child is having issues sleeping, attending school or going places, or talking and playing with others due to their fears.

Depression in children and adolescents often occurs along with excessive worries and fears. You may associate depression with excessive crying and sadness, which can occur in some children.

However other symptoms that frequently are seen in children who suffer from depression are:
• Irritability
• Anger
• Mood swings
• Feeling tired
• Difficulty sleeping
• Eating too little or too much
• Withdrawing from social activities and preferring to be alone
• Thoughts of death or suicide
• Low self-esteem
• Hopeless thoughts about the future or no vision for the future

A psychological evaluation may include:
• A diagnostic interview with the parent or caregiver that includes developmental history and current concerns

• Cognitive Assessment

• Social, emotional, and behavioral questionnaires and rating scales completed by parents, teachers, and older children/adolescents

• A comprehensive, integrated written report with results, DSM-V diagnoses, recommendations for eligibility for school services (special education or 504 eligibility), recommendations and resources for parents/teachers, and recommendations for services in the community.

• A feedback meeting with parents to review the results of the evaluation, recommendations, and develop a plan for treatment and prioritizing services

ADHD Evaluation

ADHD is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by significant difficulty paying attention and/or hyperactive/impulsive behaviors that impairs functioning across multiple settings. It is a disorder of dysregulation at its core. The diagnosis of ADHD is rarely given until a child is around 5 or 6 years of age, as these symptoms are a normal part of development in young children.

There are three types of ADHD:
1. Predominately inattentive presentation, which is characterized by difficulty paying attention, focusing, listening to instructions, etc.

2. Hyperactive/impulsive presentation, which is characterized by over activity, interrupting, blurting out, difficulty staying seated, etc.

3. Combined presentation (the most common type of ADHD), which is characterized by significant symptoms of inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity

An evaluation for ADHD might include the following components:
• A diagnostic interview with the parent or caregiver that includes developmental history and current concerns

• Cognitive Assessment

• Tests of attention and executive functioning

• Social, emotional, and behavioral questionnaires and rating scales completed by parents, teachers, and older children/adolescents

• Review of school records, curriculum-based measures, grades, and work samples

• A comprehensive, integrated written report with results, DSM-V diagnoses, recommendations for eligibility for school services (special education or 504 eligibility), recommendations and resources for parents/teachers, and recommendations for services in the community.

• A feedback meeting with parents to review the results of the evaluation, recommendations, and develop a plan for treatment and prioritizing services

Autism Evaluation

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that impacts a child’s ability to communicate and be social with other people. Children with ASD also show repetitive behaviors, intense and focused interests, rigid adherence to specific routines, difficulty with transitions, unusual sensory interests, and/or aversions to sensory experiences.

An autism evaluation may include the following components:
• A diagnostic interview with the parent or caregiver that includes developmental history and current concerns

• Cognitive Assessment

• Social/behavioral testing using the ADOS-2, a play and interview-based assessment, or the MIGDAS-2, a sensory-based process for gathering and organizing the qualitative information needed to diagnose autism in children, adolescents

• Social, emotional, and behavioral questionnaires and rating scales completed by parents, teachers, and older children/adolescents

• A comprehensive, integrated written report with results, DSM-V diagnoses, recommendations for eligibility for school services (special education or 504 eligibility), recommendations and resources for parents/teachers, and recommendations for services in the community.

• A feedback meeting with parents to review the results of the evaluation, recommendations, and develop a plan for treatment and prioritizing services

Independent Educational Evaluation

An Independent Educational Evaluation (IEE) is a private evaluation that provides a parent or guardian the opportunity to obtain their own evaluation of their child when they disagree with the school district’s results/recommended educational program. This is a right of all parents or guardians whose child has been tested through the schools and provided in IDEA (special education law). If an IEE is approved by the school district, the school district will provide you with a list of qualified professionals in the area who complete IEEs. You do not have to choose someone from this list, you may choose any qualified professional. Dr. Martin has conducted numerous IEEs for a several districts in the area including Humble ISD, Conroe ISD, Lamar CISD, and Klein ISD.

IEEs can include some or all of the following components depending on your concerns and the school’s concerns:
• A diagnostic interview with the parent or caregiver that includes developmental history and current concerns

• Assessment of intelligence, academics, executive functioning, phonological processing, orthographic processing, memory

• Social/behavioral testing using the ADOS-2 or MIGDAS-2

• Social, emotional, and behavioral questionnaires and rating scales completed by parents, teachers, older children/adolescents

• Interviews with teachers and other service providers

• School observation

• A comprehensive written report with results; recommendations for eligibility for school services (special education or 504 eligibility); recommendations to aid the ARD committee in developing a plan (accommodations, programming, specialized services)

• A feedback meeting with parents to review the results of the evaluation and recommendations